Asset Lovers, Not Fighters

Collaborative, considered, weighing up the consequences: infrastructure does not sound typically heroic.

Looking at the language around front-line working during Covid-19, we slip very easily into ‘NHS heroes’ in a ‘fight’ against the virus. I never cease to be impressed by the dedication – on low pay, at least in England – of nurses, and of course I clapped for them along with my neighbours.  My stepdaughter is an A&E paediatric nurse, so her job is reactive and high-pressure, sometimes overwhelmed.

But a conventional military image doesn’t sit well for us AM practitioners, whose role is precisely not to react.  We need a cool head, not only in crisis but in the mundane everyday – not driven by the excitement of a mega project or the latest technologies.

One thing that has always appealed to me about Asset Management is how many people in infrastructure interact with their assets. ‘People who care about things’. They do not generally think of themselves as wresting victory from hostile systems, but of working with them.  Understanding them; respecting them.  It was an asset colleague at RailCorp in Sydney who said we are lovers, not fighters.

Public service, as nurse or asset manager, doing what we do for the sake of our communities, is what keeps society working.  We need some word for it – to celebrate its worth, and praise those who do it well – but militaristic ‘heroism’ isn’t quite right.  We are not ‘fighting’ anything.

Terms like ‘noble’ or ‘honourable’ appeal, but are perhaps more military than suits me, as a (frankly) physical coward who sees nothing attractive about wars.

‘Really good people’ probably doesn’t have the right ring about it. But that’s what we mean.

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